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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

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Newsline audio releases – April 17, 2015

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with WisDOT's Radio Newsline.

Federal transportation funds will support pedestrian safety in Milwaukee, Madison and La Crosse. Larry Corsi (core-see) with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety talks about the High Visibility Enforcement grants.

Cut 1: Larry Corsi, Bureau of Transportation Safety (304 KB/19 seconds)

“Along with being urban centers, these communities have colleges and universities and a lot of pedestrian traffic where we sometimes see conflicts with motorists. So the city and the UW police departments will use the grants to do additional law enforcement — and the goal really — is to stress the need for pedestrians and motorists to be alert and safe at all times.”

Cut 2: Larry Corsi, Bureau of Transportation Safety (284 KB/18 seconds)

“Both motorists and pedestrians need to pay attention to distracted driving — put down your cell phones, don’t use the ear buds, make sure you’re paying attention to what’s going on around you. Pedestrians should always use crosswalks and be alert about what’s going on around them. Don’t just step out into traffic. Make eye contact with the drivers to make sure they see you.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Corsi (759 KB/49 seconds)

Federal funds will be used to enhance pedestrian safety in Milwaukee, Madison and La Crosse. Larry Corsi with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety talks about the $70,000 in federal High Visibility Enforcement grants.

“Along with being urban centers, these communities have colleges and universities and a lot of pedestrian traffic where we sometimes see conflicts with motorists. So the city and the UW police departments will use the grants to do additional law enforcement — and the goal really — is to stress the need for pedestrians and motorists to be alert and safe at all times.”

Corsi says motorists and pedestrians should limit distractions but putting away cell phones and ear buds. There were 43 pedestrians killed in Wisconsin traffic crashes last year. This is Rob Miller reporting.

Wednesday is Earth Day and a time to think about ways to recycle and conserve. The Wisconsin DOT does its part by recycling old pavements as part of new roadways. Steve Krebs with the Wisconsin DOT’s Materials Management Section explains.

Cut 1: Steve Krebs, Materials Management (351 KB/22 seconds)

“The two largest types of materials that we recycle are concrete and asphalt pavements. Asphalts can be re-heated and re-used as part of the new pavement. With concrete, we’ll crush it into smaller pieces and it can be used in a number of different applications in the highway such as shoulder material along the roadway, or as base course underneath the pavement.”

Cut 2: Steve Krebs, Materials Management (292 KB/19 seconds)

“Along with recycling, we also incorporate waste materials into the development of new pavements. For example, asphalt shingles can be ground up and used as part of a new asphaltic pavement. Fly ash — which is a by-product of coal-fired power plants — can be used as part of a concrete pavement.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Krebs (1244 KB/80 seconds)

Wednesday is Earth Day and a chance for people to think about more ways to recycle and conserve. Steve Krebs is with the Wisconsin DOT’s Materials Management Section. He says each year, the DOT uses about 1.5 million tons of recycled materials as part of transportation projects.

“The two largest types of materials that we recycle are concrete and asphalt pavements. Asphalts can be re-heated and re-used as part of the new pavement. With concrete, we’ll crush it into smaller pieces and it can be used in a number of different applications in the highway such as shoulder material along the roadway, or as base course underneath the pavement.”

And how much asphalt pavement is recycled each year?

“The amount of recycled asphalt pavement used in Wisconsin each year would pave a two-lane highway two-inches thick all the way from Kenosha to Superior.”

To preserve landfill space and decrease the need for virgin materials, Krebs says waste products are also used in Wisconsin road-building. Asphalt shingles can be ground up and used as part of new asphaltic pavement, while fly ash — a by-product of coal-burning power plants — can be used as part of a concrete pavement. This is Rob Miller reporting.


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LLast modified: April 16, 2015

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